Better Know A Leader – Sir Wilfrid Laurier (Canada) – Civilization 6 History

REFERENCES

1. https://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibiti… • “In 1899, fighting erupted between Great Britain and two small republics in South Africa. (See map) The two republics, settled by Boers, descendants of the region’s first Dutch immigrants, were not expected to survive for long against the world’s greatest power. Pro-Empire Canadians nevertheless urged their government to help. 2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_S…. 3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recipro…) 4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populat… • Population of Canada in 1895 was 5,026,000 and rose to 7,207,000 in 1911. 5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Be… https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cliffor… https://pier21.ca/research/immigratio… 6. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… • The Chinese Head tax was introduced in 1885 and was not stopped until 1923. • Part of the “Chinese Immigration Act (1885)” • “With few exceptions, Chinese people had to pay at least $50 to come to Canada. The tax was later raised to $100, then to $500. In 2006, the federal government apologized for the head tax and its other racist immigration policies targeting Chinese people.” 7. https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discove… • “This early immigration to Canada was met with much hostility in British Columbia. As a result of this, East Indian immigration to Canada decreased dramatically until the 1940s. However, other restrictions were applied over the years, such as the “continuous voyage” regulation of 1908.” 8. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… • “Order-in-Council P.C. 1324 was approved on 12 August 1911 by the Cabinet of Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier. The purpose of the order was to ban Black persons from entering Canada for a period of one year because, it read, “the Negro race…is deemed unsuitable to the climate and requirements of Canada.”” 9. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… • Generally speaking – the Canadian government failed to live up to its term of the agreement when sending provisions to aboriginal peoples when they moved to reservations. 10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadia… https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… https://indigenousfoundations.arts.ub… • “European settlers in Canada brought with them the assumption that their own civilization was the pinnacle of human achievement. They interpreted the socio-cultural differences between themselves and the Aboriginal peoples as proof that Canada’s first inhabitants were ignorant, savage, and—like children—in need of guidance.” • “Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned journalist and politician Nicholas Flood Davin to study industrial schools for Aboriginal children in the United States. • “In the 1880s, in conjunction with other federal assimilation policies, the government began to establish residential schools across Canada. 11. http://www.trc.ca/ • Affiliated with the University of Manitoba – the report is incredibly detailed into the history of the residential school system. APPENDIX 1. The Liberal Party had support solidly in Quebec and The Conservative Party drew support from English Canadians. French Canadian Catholics were more socially conservative. Laurier was known for his ability to draw additional support from English Canada. His opposition to conscription in WWI would solidify Liberal support in Quebec until Quebec separatism become the prevailing political force in the 1970’s onward. See https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… for more detail. Musical credits: Heartbreaking by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-… Artist: http://incompetech.com/ “O Canada” bilingual version sung by Julie Nesrallah and Nathalie Paulin “O Canada” French version sung by Nathalie Paulin “O Canada” Instrumental version conducted by Peter Oundjian “Fallen Soldier” by Biz Baz Studio Places for Further reading: • Encyclopedia Britannica: https://www.britannica.com/place/Cana… • The Canadian Encyclopedia https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c… • The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation http://www.trc.ca/ • Sir Wilfrid Laurier Wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfrid…